python-pbr 5.6.0-0ubuntu1 source package in Ubuntu

Changelog

python-pbr (5.6.0-0ubuntu1) impish; urgency=medium

  * New upstream release for OpenStack Xena.
  * d/*: Sync in changes from uploads.

 -- Chris MacNaughton <email address hidden>  Fri, 11 Jun 2021 10:47:53 +0000

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Uploaded by:
Chris MacNaughton
Uploaded to:
Impish
Original maintainer:
Ubuntu Developers
Architectures:
all
Section:
python
Urgency:
Medium Urgency

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Series Pocket Published Component Section
Impish release main python

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Impish: [FULLYBUILT] amd64

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File Size SHA-256 Checksum
python-pbr_5.6.0.orig.tar.gz 122.3 KiB 42df03e7797b796625b1029c0400279c7c34fd7df24a7d7818a1abb5b38710dd
python-pbr_5.6.0-0ubuntu1.debian.tar.xz 9.8 KiB fd958fe4065b536c6d96048396ca93d1230f1818a0ac41dd107d02b6b99f4f91
python-pbr_5.6.0-0ubuntu1.dsc 2.8 KiB 163b8ce39d3b1d667dc12b3056d2a6de7718bc0bdb2e8747d64c1f3db999454d

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Binary packages built by this source

python-pbr-doc: inject useful and sensible default behaviors into setuptools - doc

 PBR (Python Build Reasonableness) is a library that injects some useful and
 sensible default behaviors into your setuptools run. PBR can:
  * Manage version number based on git revisions and tags (Version file).
  * Generate AUTHORS file from git log
  * Generate ChangeLog from git log
  * Generate Sphinx autodoc stub files for your whole module
  * Store your dependencies in a pip requirements file
  * Use your README file as a long_description
  * Smartly find packages under your root package
 .
 PBR is only mildly configurable. The basic idea is that there's a decent way
 to run things and if you do, you should reap the rewards, because then it's
 simple and repeatable. If you want to do things differently, cool! But you've
 already got the power of Python at your fingertips, so you don't really need
 PBR.
 .
 PBR builds on top of the work that d2to1 started to provide for declarative
 configuration. d2to1 is itself an implementation of the ideas behind
 distutils2. Although distutils2 is now abandoned in favor of work towards PEP
 426 and Metadata 2.0, declarative config is still a great idea and
 specifically important in trying to distribute setup code as a library when
 that library itself will alter how the setup is processed. As Metadata 2.0 and
 other modern Python packaging PEPs come out, PBR aims to support them as
 quickly as possible.
 .
 This package provides the documentation.

python3-pbr: inject useful and sensible default behaviors into setuptools - Python 3.x

 PBR (Python Build Reasonableness) is a library that injects some useful and
 sensible default behaviors into your setuptools run. PBR can:
  * Manage version number based on git revisions and tags (Version file).
  * Generate AUTHORS file from git log
  * Generate ChangeLog from git log
  * Generate Sphinx autodoc stub files for your whole module
  * Store your dependencies in a pip requirements file
  * Use your README file as a long_description
  * Smartly find packages under your root package
 .
 PBR is only mildly configurable. The basic idea is that there's a decent way
 to run things and if you do, you should reap the rewards, because then it's
 simple and repeatable. If you want to do things differently, cool! But you've
 already got the power of Python at your fingertips, so you don't really need
 PBR.
 .
 PBR builds on top of the work that d2to1 started to provide for declarative
 configuration. d2to1 is itself an implementation of the ideas behind
 distutils2. Although distutils2 is now abandoned in favor of work towards PEP
 426 and Metadata 2.0, declarative config is still a great idea and
 specifically important in trying to distribute setup code as a library when
 that library itself will alter how the setup is processed. As Metadata 2.0 and
 other modern Python packaging PEPs come out, PBR aims to support them as
 quickly as possible.
 .
 This package provides support for Python 3.x.