task-spooler 0.7.5-1 source package in Ubuntu

Changelog

task-spooler (0.7.5-1) unstable; urgency=medium

  * Imported Upstream version 0.7.5
  * Bump Standards-Version to 3.9.6 (no changes)
  * Escape dots in watchfile regex
  * Use new URL for Vcs-Browser
  * Remove useless docs from package
  * Fix typo in cppflags.patch
  * Enable all hardening options
  * Update copyright file
    - Set upstream license to GPL2
    - Change upstream contact
    - Update copyright years
    - Add missing license for man page
  * Add modification notice to man page

 -- Alexander Inyukhin <email address hidden>  Sat, 02 May 2015 23:13:49 +0300

Upload details

Uploaded by:
shurick on 2015-05-09
Uploaded to:
Sid
Original maintainer:
shurick
Architectures:
any
Section:
misc
Urgency:
Medium Urgency

See full publishing history Publishing

Series Pocket Published Component Section
Xenial release on 2015-10-22 universe misc

Downloads

File Size SHA-256 Checksum
task-spooler_0.7.5-1.dsc 1.8 KiB 36ebe5ae88deb945f21418821455a737dae544b08de4e7259a883c56ecde40e0
task-spooler_0.7.5.orig.tar.gz 63.4 KiB 216d09dcfbae2f9bfea7582a71494172fe91c33d65499ea01b3bcac0600de96d
task-spooler_0.7.5-1.debian.tar.xz 4.2 KiB 64713cf63d0d544f613e012c276f537637cc8f4807b054409dad9316d70d3dd6

Available diffs

No changes file available.

Binary packages built by this source

task-spooler: personal job scheduler

 Task spooler is a Unix batch system where the tasks spooled run one
 after the other. Each user in each system has his own job queue. The tasks are
 run in the correct context (that of enqueue) from any shell/process, and its
 output/results can be easily watched. It is very useful when you know that
 your commands depend on a lot of RAM, a lot of disk use, give a lot of
 output, or for whatever reason it's better not to run them at the same time.

task-spooler-dbgsym: debug symbols for package task-spooler

 Task spooler is a Unix batch system where the tasks spooled run one
 after the other. Each user in each system has his own job queue. The tasks are
 run in the correct context (that of enqueue) from any shell/process, and its
 output/results can be easily watched. It is very useful when you know that
 your commands depend on a lot of RAM, a lot of disk use, give a lot of
 output, or for whatever reason it's better not to run them at the same time.